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WI State Taxidermist Competition

Taxidermists from around the state compete in different categories to be state champion. Feb 22-25st, 2018 in Steven's Point, WI.

 
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A summer competition and member meeting. August 10-12th, 2018 at the Door County Rod & Gun Club and AmericInn in Sturgeon Bay, WI.

 

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Wisconsin Information on this article comes from numerous articles written on CWD and is compiled here to assist members in understanding the problem we are facing. Some of this information will change after printing as new information comes out weekly. We will try to keep members informed on all the updates as time goes along. The DNR website, ww.dnr.state.wi.us, has a lot of up to date info on CWD which is readily available.

Update March 2009

Thomas Van Haren, Conservation Warden and NR Policy Officer of the Bureau of Law Enforcement, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, reported the following in an email in regards to the Deer Carcass transportation issue.

The legislature gave the DNR the authority to restrict deer carcass movement to control CWD effective April 21, 2006. The Department of Natural Resources appointed 18 citizens of diverse interests in the state’s wild deer herd, to an advisory group to offer recommendations to the Department and the Natural Resources Board regarding future Chronic Wasting Disease management. The advisory group met one Saturday per month from July, 2007 through December, 2007 and two Saturdays in January, 2008. A copy of this groups report is attached.

As a result of the recommendations that came out of this advisory group the DNR advanced a rule proposal in 2008 to restrict deer carcass movement from in-state and out-of-state CWD areas as provided by the statute.

I have attached a copy of the statutory language and the DNR rules language, as well as some background on rules for the surrounding states and response we received on these rules at the Rule hearings held in Green Bay, Rhinelander, Eau Claire, Dodgeville, Baraboo, Fitchburg, Janesville, and Big Bend. Written comments were also accepted through March 25, 2008. This rule was supported by the majority of those attending the hearings and was passed by the Natural Resources Board and legislative review. This new rule will take effect September 1, 2009.

We placed an advanced notice of the new transportation restrictions in the 2008 Deer hunting regulations pamphlet so hunters would be aware of the restriction coming the following season. It can be found on pages 3 and in more detail on page 15. It will appear again in the 2009 Deer Hunting Regulations pamphlet. We will also likely be developing additional handout materials for others affected by this rule, such as vehicle operators that hit deer and request a tag, taxidermists, etc.

I hope this information is helpful. As we get more information developed, we can share it with you.

Editor’s Notes:
Van Haren can be contacted at 608.266.3244.

Copy of Legislation passed and took effect April 21, 2006

Wis. Statute Section 29.063 Management of chronic wasting disease.
  1. The department may manage, and provide funding to conduct testing for, chronic wasting disease in cervids.
  2. If the department designates an area as a chronic wasting disease eradication zone, the department shall provide notice and information to the public that is adequate to inform the public prior to the commencement of hunting that hunting of cervids to control the spread of the disease will occur in that zone.
  3. To control chronic wasting disease, the department may promulgate rules regulating the transportation, possession, control, storage, or disposal of the carcass of a cervid in this state, except that the rules may not apply to any of the following:
    1. (a) Meat that is cut and wrapped, either commercially or privately.
    2. (b) Quarters or other portions of meat to which no part of the spinal column or head is attached.
    3. (c) Meat that has been deboned.
    4. (d) Hides with no heads attached.
    5. (e) Finished taxidermy heads.
    6. (f) Antlers with no meat or tissue attached.
    7. (g) Skulls with antlers attached and with no meat or tissue attached.
    8. (h) Upper canine teeth.
  4. The department may promulgate rules prohibiting the transportation of the carcass of a cervid from another state or country in which chronic wasting disease has been confirmed in a cervid, except that the rules may not apply to any of the following:
    1. (a) Meat that is cut and wrapped, either commercially or privately.
    2. (b) Quarters or other portions of meat to which no part of the spinal column or head is attached.
    3. (c) Meat that has been deboned.
    4. (d) Hides with no heads attached.
    5. (e) Finished taxidermy heads.
    6. (f) Antlers with no meat or tissue attached.
    7. (g) Skulls with antlers attached and with no meat or tissue attached.
    8. (h) Upper canine teeth.
  5. The department may exempt deer hunters from obtaining a license under this chapter for the hunting of deer in an area that the department has designated by rule as a chronic wasting disease control zone. Deer hunters that are exempted under this subsection shall be at least 12 years of age, except that a person born on or after January 1, 1973, may not hunt deer under this subsection unless he or she complies with ss. 29.304 and 29.593. The department shall by rule establish eligibility criteria and application procedures for receipt of an exemption under this subsection, including a method for obtaining a permit to hunt deer without a license under this subsection.

Copy of DNR Rules passed in 2008 and which do not take effect until 9-1-09

"Cervid" means a member of the family of animals that includes deer, elk, moose, caribou and reindeer.

NR 10.105 Transportation of bear, deer and other members of the cervid family.
  1. (4) TRANSPORTATION OF DEER FROM A CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE MANAGEMENT ZONE. The carcasses of deer harvested in a chronic wasting disease management zone identified in s. NR 10.28(3) may not be transported outside of that zone except for the following:
    1. a) Carcasses transported into deer management units adjacent to the chronic wasting disease management zone.
    2. (b) Meat that is cut and wrapped, either commercially or privately.
    3. (c) Quarters or other portions of meat to which no part of the spinal column is attached.
    4. (d) Meat that has been deboned.
    5. (e) Hides with no head attached.
    6. (f) Finished taxidermy heads.
    7. (g) Antlers with no meat or tissue attached.
    8. (h) Skulls with antlers attached and with no meat or tissue attached.
    9. (i) Upper canine teeth.
  2. (5) TRANSPORTATION OF MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY CERVIDAE FROM AREAS IN OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES WHERE CWD HAS NOT BEEN IDENTIFIED. Hunters transporting carcasses into Wisconsin from other states or countries shall possess, and exhibit to agents of the department upon request, registration or other materials showing whether the carcass was harvested in a CWD area or a non-CWD area.
  3. (6) TRANSPORTATION OF MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY CERVIDAE FROM OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES WHERE CWD HAS BEEN IDENTIFIED. The carcasses of cervid species harvested in a management unit or similarly identifiable area where CWD has been verified by a government agency in another state or country may not be transported into this state except for the following:
    1. (a) Meat that is cut and wrapped, either commercially or privately.
    2. (b) Quarters or other portions of meat to which no part of the spinal column is attached.
    3. (c) Meat that has been deboned.
    4. (d) Hides with no head attached.
    5. (e) Finished taxidermy heads.
    6. (f) Antlers with no meat or tissue attached.
    7. (g) Skulls with antlers attached and with no meat or tissue attached
    8. (h) Upper canine teeth.

Comparison with rules in Adjacent States:

Illinois

The importation of hunter-harvested deer and elk carcasses is prohibited with the exception of deboned meat, antlers, antlers which are attached to skull caps, upper canine teeth, and finished taxidermy mounts. Hunters may import cervid animal carcasses if they are transported to a licensed meat processor or licensed taxidermists within 72 hours of entering the state. Illinois first discovered CWD in November of 2002. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources has established special hunting seasons to stem the spread of wildlife diseases. The law provides flexibility in efforts to contain transmissible diseases such as CWD and Bovine Tuberculosis. The ability to harvest deer in specific, targeted locations is an important component of their efforts to reduce transmission rates and to prevent the further spread of such diseases. Illinois has also increased deer permit availability and allowed the use of firearms that were previously restricted in areas of known infection.

Iowa


The importation of whole carcasses from any cervid taken in a CWD endemic area within any state or province is prohibited. Only boned-out meat, capes, and antlers attached to clean skull plates from which the brain tissue has been removed are allowed. Iowa is not known to have any wild deer or elk test CWD-positive. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources has tested thousands of deer for CWD in recent hunting seasons. Monitoring efforts have been primarily focused upon game management units adjacent to the Wisconsin and Illinois border. Because CWD has yet to be discovered there, many of the actions taken and rules instituted have been proactive and preventative, aimed at limiting the risk of CWD transmission to animals within the state.

Michigan

The importation of carcasses or parts of free-ranging deer or elk into Michigan is prohibited if the carcasses or parts originated from a state or province having CWD in their free-ranging deer or elk population. Exceptions are made for deboned meat, antlers, antlers attached to a skull cap cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue, hides cleaned of excess tissue or blood, upper canine teeth, finished taxidermy mounts, and tissue imported for use by a diagnostic or research laboratory. Michigan is not known to have any wild deer or elk test CWD-positive. Michigan has taken preventative management efforts to limit the risk of CWD. In 2003 their Governor created a CWD Task Force which recommended a statewide surveillance program and prompt action to kill infected or exposed animals if CWD is discovered. The task force supported intensive surveillance efforts within 5 miles of the immediate area of an infection. Within this 5-mile radius, approximately 300 deer older than 18 months of age would be harvested and tested. If other positives were discovered, full-scale control efforts would be initiated including the development of 5-mile radius zones with the objective of deer de-population and the establishment of larger zones to continue surveillance. The group recommended cooperative efforts with landowners to harvest deer in areas of infection to both prevent transmission and to gauge prevalence levels.

Minnesota

The importation of whole cervid carcasses into the state from CWD endemic areas as determined by the MN Board of Animal Health is prohibited. Only cut and wrapped meat, quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, antlers, hides, or teeth, finished taxidermy mounts, and antlers attached to skull caps that are cleaned of all brain tissue may be imported. Minnesota is currently one of nine states to have identified CWD in a captive facility. Intensive surveillance efforts have failed to detect any positive cases in the wild cervid population. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has made CWD sample collection mandatory in specially designated areas where more information is deemed necessary.

Online Videos

Many seminars and other videos in the library are now available online.

  1. Send Alan Kitzhaber and email at alkitzhaber@msn.comwith the video title.
  2. Al will email you a link.
  3. Click on the link and then press the play button.
  4. Now, give it a try!

Any questions? Contact Alan Kitzhaber at 715.379.1579 (Cell) or 715.834.4470 (Home)

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