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  • Competition Galleries

    Competition Galleries

    See all the top scoring mounts from last year's competition and years past.

    Galleries
  • 2020 WTA Convention
    Stevens Point, WI
    Holiday Inn Convention Center
    February 20-23, 2020
    More Details
  • Join The WTA

    Join The WTA

    Become part of the Wisconsin Taxidermist Association family

    Quarterly Newsletter
    Special Vendor Pricing at Events
    Free Seminars
    Read More
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  • Birds
  • Fish
  • Mammals
harmonica pete

Birds can be one of the toughest mounts to recreate. The best way to understand a good bird mount is to look at a real bird or photos of live birds and compare...

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USFWS Mountain Prairie

Fish taxidermy has come a long way in the last decade or so. However, not all taxidermists are familiar with these advances, nor use the reference materials so readily...

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wikimedia

Whether a full body or a shoulder mount, mammal taxidermy starts with good fleshing and tanning. Improper fleshing results in shrinkage and poor detail work...

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  • Field Care +

    Good taxidermy begins with good field care. Without a good specimen, there are problems before the work even begins. The skin begins to decay immediately upon death, so take care of your specimen as soon as possible. Keeping it cold slows this breakdown; freezing stops it. Always freeze specimens sealed in an airtight plastic bag to avoid damage by freezer burn. Fish Once landed, don't Read More
  • Mount Care +

    Dust your mounts frequently with a feather or fleece duster in the direction of the hair, fur or feathers. Don't be afraid to groom mammal mounts - hair often gets mussed up moving them. Smooth fur with fingers or with a dog brush. Eyes and noses may be kept clean with window cleaner and a Q-tip. Fish should be wiped with a damp rag. Occasional cleaning Read More
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Happenings

WI State Taxidermist Competition

Taxidermists from around the state compete in different categories to be state champion. Feb 20-23th, 2020 in Steven's Point, WI.

 
Rendezvous

A fall competition and member meeting. August 9th to August 11th, 2019. in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin.

 

Welcome to the Wisconsin Taxidermy Association website. Our goal here at the WTA Is to provide our members with the best cutting edge training and techniques in the art of taxidermy. If you are looking for a taxidermist this website is your resource to some of the best taxidermists in the country. You will also find information on proper field care for your specimens. Whether you're looking for a taxidermist or you're looking to become a better taxidermist this website has it all. I truly believe we are one of the top taxidermy associations in the country. Feel free to browse the website and take a look at what it has to offer. If you're considering becoming a member and have any questions feel free to contact me.

Troy Piotrowski
President 2017-2019

The movement of dead or alive CWD positive animals (natural or human-assisted) is a key pathway in the spread of CWD. The infectious nature of the CWD prion contributes to an increased risk of introduction and spread of CWD if dead animals are brought to areas where CWD does not exist if not disposed of properly.

Deer carcass movement in Wisconsin

Carcass movement restrictions are currently in place to assist in limiting the spread of disease. Both whole wild-deer carcasses and certain parts of carcasses from CWD affected counties [PDF] can only be moved within CWD affected counties and to a county adjacent to a CWD affected county [PDF].

Hunters are allowed to take whole cervid carcasses or any parts of carcasses harvested in the CWD-affected counties or in any state or province where CWD has been found, into any part of Wisconsin, provided the carcass (or nonexempt parts) are taken to a licensed taxidermist or meat processor within 72 hours of registering a Wisconsin deer, or within 72 hours of entering Wisconsin from another state. Meat processors and taxidermists are excluded since they must follow strict rules regarding waste disposal, thereby removing the risks associated with improper disposal.

The department does not intend to preclude hunters from moving a deer head outside of an adjacent CWD affected county if that head is being transported to an approved CWD sampling cooperator, self-service kiosk, or staffed CWD testing location for the purpose of submitting the head for removal of tissues for CWD testing. After sample tissue has been removed from deer heads submitted via these submission routes the heads will be disposed of properly.

Recommendations

The following recommendations expand on deer carcass movement practices that can reduce the risk of spreading CWD.

  • Do not transport whole wild deer carcasses or any deer brain, spinal cord or lymph node tissue to areas outside the county or adjacent county that the animal was harvested.
  • Do not transport whole carcasses or any deer brain, spinal cord or lymph tissue from a state/province that has CWD into WI.
  • Use processor and/or taxidermists that practice approved disposal methods. Hunters from other stations/provinces should be aware of their state's carcass restrictions for deer harvested in a CWD affected areas before heading home.

Exceptions

Deer parts that may be moved

  • Meat that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately).
  • Quarters or other portions of meat to which no part of the spinal column is attached.
  • Meat that has been deboned.
  • Hides with no heads attached.
  • Finished taxidermy heads.
  • Antlers with no tissue attached.
  • Clean skull plates with no lymphoid or brain tissue attached.
  • Clean skulls with no lymphoid or brain tissue attached.
  • Upper canine teeth (also known as buglers, whistlers or ivories).

If not brought to a licensed taxidermist or meat processor within 72 hours, the only parts from wild cervids legally-harvested in the CWD affected counties that may be transported beyond those counties adjacent to the CWD affected counties are included in the table. These are the same parts that are allowed into WI from other states and provinces that have CWD.

Deer carcass movement into Wisconsin

Chronic wasting disease has been found in wild cervids in the following states and provides (http://cwd-info.org/map-chronic-wasting-disease-in-north-america/) Hunters from other states/provinces should be aware of their state’s carcass restrictions (http://cwd-info.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/CWDRegstableState- Province.pdf) of deer harvested in a CWD affected area in Wisconsin before heading home. Whole carcasses and parts of carcasses, other than those listed in the table, from these states and provinces are not allowed into Wisconsin unless taken to a meat processor or taxidermist within 72 hours of entry into Wisconsin.

  • United States: Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming
  • Canadian Provinces: Alberta and Saskatchewan

Join the WTA

Become part of the Wisconsin Taxidermist Association family.

Membership includes:

  • Membership Card
  • Quarterly Newsletter
  • Special Vendor Pricing at Events
  • Free Seminars
Learn More

Avian Challenge 2020

The 2020 Avian Challenge is a Wood Duck chosen by the 2019 winner, Tom Stuck. Winner will be chosen on anatomy and craftsmanship based on a supplied reference photo.

Avian Challenge 2020 - Standing Wood Duck

Avian Challenge 2019

The 2019 Avian Challenge was a Mallard picture chosen by the 2018 winner, Tim Cooley. Winner will be chosen on anatomy and craftsmanship based on a supplied reference photo.

Avian Challenge 2019 - Standing Mallard Avian Challenge 2019 Winner - Tom Stuck